DICTIONARY OF ENVIRONMENTAL FORENSICS:
  Standard Terminology used in Environmental Forensics with Special Emphasis on U.S. Regulations and Standards.
   
   
 
   
  Corporate Office
57 Hamilton Avenue
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466.9628 phone
(609) 466.4437 fax
   
  North Office
93 Spring Street
Newton, NJ 07860
(973) 940.1144 phone
(973) 940.1145 fax
 
 
We have worked on over 1,000 environmental sites, ranging from large industrial facilities to residential properties with leaking underground storage tanks. Examples of projects we have completed include:
   
Project 1: FORENSIC STUDY AT A NORTHERN NEW JERSEY SERVICE STATION: THE MIXING OF OLD AND NEW GASOLINE

In 2000, a client purchased a gasoline service station in northern New Jersey. A few days after receiving possession of the property, he received a letter from a State regulatory agency informing him that an investigation surrounding a leaking waste oil UST was required.

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Project 2: A FORENSIC STUDY AT AN ABANDONED SERVICE STATION ALONG THE NEW JERSEY SHORE: HOW THE MIXED LEADS CAN HELP

In the late 1990s, a real estate developer purchased an abandoned service station at a sheriff’s sale. The site was located on the barrier island near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The service station had been owned previously by an independent operator. That owner purchased the property from a major oil company in 1983.

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Project 3: A FORENSIC STUDY TO DIFFERENTIATE TWO DISSOLVED GASOLINE PLUMES AT ADJOINING SERVICE STATIONS

Three gasoline service stations are present at a highway intersection in central New Jersey. In the mid- to late- 1980s, service station “B” began to notice large discrepancies in their gasoline inventory. The USTs were removed in 1988 and a significant release was discovered.

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Project 4: THE HISTORY OF LEADED GASOLINE 

Forensic investigations are often a combination of both scientific techniques and historical background studies. One example that is often used is the background to leaded gasoline. Gasoline service stations can be found on many street corners and, in fact, there were many more service stations in the United States in the 1960s than there are today. This means that potential sources of contamination criss-cross the country and can be found in just about every neighbourhood.

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